Megan Rindskopf quoted in Kiplinger

What to Do in Case of Financial Emergency Sooner or later, you’re bound to get hit with an unexpected and eye-popping cost. Maybe a hospital stay will slam you with thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket charges, expensive car repairs will take you for a ride or Uncle Sam will send you a hefty tax bill. Ideally, you’ve stashed at least six months’ worth of living expenses in a savings account to help in situations like these (or in case a job loss stunts your income for a while). But especially for young people who haven’t had much time to save, sometimes the cash isn’t there. If you have yet to build up an emergency fund, consider these options to help cover any big, unexpected costs.  Click to read the article.      

Do Small Cap Stocks Know Something We Don’t?

The Wall Street Journal reported this week the small-cap Russell 2000 closed below its 200-day moving average on Tuesday for the first time since November 2012, snapping a streak of 363 trading days above the closely watched technical indicator. That marked the index’s third longest streak dating back to its inception in 1978.  While history is not always an accurate predictor of the future, it can sometimes serve as a reference point, particularly when it comes to market cycles.  This technical indicator (the 200-day moving average) is often used as a benchmark to gauge a market’s long-term trend. When a stock or index trades above the 200-day, it is in an uptrend. But when it falls below, it is in a downtrend that could lead to more declines. The Russell 2000 dropped 1.6% Tuesday to 1108. It is down 7.1% from the record high hit in March and down almost 5% year-to-date. As the Wall Street Journal reports, “about half of the Russell’s components are down 20% or more from their respective 52-high weeks. Some 80% of them are down Read on! →