Year End College Financial Aid Considerations

2014 is quickly coming to an end but financial moves you make in the next two weeks could make a difference in the financial aid your child may receive in the 2015/2016 academic year. Because college financial assistance is based primarily on the previous year’s income and assets, be certain of the financial impact before selling an investment, receiving gifts, spending on big ticket items or borrowing to make improvements to your home. Financial Aid Forms The amount of need-based financial aid a student may receive stems from information parents provide The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA and the CSS/Financial Aid Profile. The new FAFSA form will be available beginning January 1 at FAFSA.ed.gov and the CSS form is available now at collegeboard.org. The somewhat less familiar CSS form, typically used to seek financial assistance directly from the school, is often used for private universities to gather more information about your family. It uses much of the same information provided to FAFSA but goes further requesting data such as three years of income history. CSS also allows families Read on! →

How to Juggle College and Retirement Savings

How do you successfully negotiate the conflicting goals of saving for your children’s college educations, as well as saving for retirement? If you are like most people, these two goals are constantly competing for your savings dollars and it can be difficult to prioritize one over the other, especially since education seems a more pressing goal. If you are feeling stretched and maybe discouraged as you battle these opponents, there are a few key takeaways to consider: Prioritize Appropriately You cannot look at these two goals serially, thinking that if you just focus on the education piece and work your way through this, then you will be able to focus on retirement savings. Because the resources needed for retirement are so substantial, it is typically not an amount that can be accumulated in short order, but rather needs the advantage of years of compounding to accomplish. Current lifespans suggest we need to save for retirement at a level which could sustain us for upwards of 30 years. Therefore, retirement savings needs to be occurring early and often in order to Read on! →

Treven Ayers, CIO quoted in the Wall Street Journal

Treven Ayers, CIO was quoted in the Wall Street Journal as part of an article entitled, “Oil’s Decline Creating Stock Bargains for Financial Advisers”. Treven Ayers, chief investment officer at Clearview Wealth Management in Charlotte, N.C., has also been taking advantage of the downturn, rebalancing client portfolios into the selloff. His firm, which manages $65 million, is finding opportunities in domestic and international stocks as well as energy-focused MLPs and global bonds. If you are a current subscriber to the Wall Street Journal online, you can view the entire article here.