Just Dating? 3 Money Topics to Discuss before you get Serious!

Cheryl Sherrard, CFP was quoted recently in a Learnvest article by Meghan Rabbitt, entitled, “Just Dating?  3 Money Topics to Discuss before you get Serious”. Dating discussion #1 included talking about your family money histories. For instance, if he grew up with no money, he may have an inordinate fear of never having enough. On the flip side, if his parents always forked over cash, he may have never learned to delay gratification, says Cheryl Sherrard, a Certified Financial Planner™ (CFP®) and director of financial planning for Clearview Wealth Management in Charlotte, N.C. Knowing what shaped his views can help you compare his experiences to your own and see where your differences may lie. “I think people tend to assume that everyone else will deal with money the same way they do, and don’t think about the fact that money—or the lack thereof—can carry huge emotional ties as well,” Sherrard says. Dating discussion #2 focused on your Debt Situation. Debt can be a squirm-inducing, four-letter word in the realm of dating. But it ranks high on the list of important Read on! →

Cheryl Sherrard is featured speaker at February 2nd luncheon

Cheryl Sherrard, CFP will be speaking at the “Seasoned to Perfection” lunch group at Matthews United Methodist Church on February 2, 2016.  She will be speaking to the group about “Conversations on Aging” and the 5 essential conversations for families.  To have Cheryl as a speaker for your event, click here to contact us with the details.

Save for Retirement and Tackle your Student Loans

A recent Forbes.com article entitled “Yes, you can save for retirement and pay your student loans” featured advice by Cheryl Sherrard regarding the desired approach for tackling student debt while also saving for the future. An excerpt from the article follows: Fund your emergency savings account. Once you’re doing the basics in terms of retirement savings and student loan payments, start stashing money in an emergency savings account. If an unexpected event occurs, having a rainy day fund will keep you from borrowing from your retirement account or taking on credit card debt. “You’ve got to have a cushion for emergencies,” says Cheryl J. Sherrard, a certified financial planner and director of financial planning and clearview wealth management in Charlotte, N.C. Increase payments strategically. After you’ve got your emergency account squared away, you can start thinking about the best way to direct any additional funds. If you have high-interest, private student loans, using extra cash to pay those off first is a smart move. If your student loans have low interest rates, you may be off better putting money in the Read on! →

Top 10 Financial Mistakes Women Make

An article posted December 8, 2015 by Sallie Krawcheck highlights “The Top 10 Financial Mistakes Women Make”. Here are her top 3 mistakes; see if they apply to you. Letting your husband or partner manage the money without your involvement. Signing your joint income tax return without reading it. Using your husband’s or partner’s financial provider, even if you don’t really like/know/can’t stand him. For the complete article, click here. If you want to be empowered and educated about your own financial situation, contact a Clearview Wealth Management advisor to discuss.  

O Value, Where Art Thou?

A recent article by Dougal Williams, CFA highlights the ongoing battle between value and growth in the investment world, giving food for thought in why your portfolio should always be well-diversified. It’s been 15 years since the Coen Brothers’ Oscar-nominated film O Brother, Where Art Thou? was released. Loosely based on Homer’s The Odyssey, the satirical tale follows three escaped convicts as they run from the law in search of buried treasure. For nearly the same length of time, value stocks – those bargain-priced shares which often pay higher dividends – have underperformed growth stocks. As a result, investors who favor value stocks must certainly feel like they are on an unrewarding investment odyssey of their own. How can this be? Aren’t value stocks supposed to deliver higher returns than growth stocks? To read the entire article, click here.