When Millennials Move Back Home

Cheryl J. Sherrard, CFP was quoted in a September 21st article in the Wall Street Journal, focused on what parents should know, and do, about the financial challenges of boomerang children. More millennials are spending early adulthood in the same place where they spent their formative years: in their parents’ homes. It’s crucial that both parties understand the financial implications of this homecoming. For parents, a child’s return often means a greater financial burden, just as the parents may be struggling to meet their own savings and retirement goals. It also can make it more difficult for the millennials to acquire the financial skills they’ll need later in life. According to a recent study by PEW Research Center, the percentage of 18- to 34-year-olds living with their parents is higher today than it has been in decades. Currently, 26% are back in the nest, up from 22% in 2007. The rise has occurred among both high-school and college graduates, and has continued since the recession’s end, despite the fact that millennials are earning more and have a lower unemployment rate than Read on! →

Advisers Stick by Commodity ETFs Despite Dramatic Declines

Treven L. Ayers, MA, CFS, CFP® quoted in The Wall Street Journal. The rise of exchange-traded funds and notes makes it easy for everyone to own commodities, and many financial advisers recommend small stakes as permanent elements of a diversified portfolio. But the average broad-basket commodities ETF has lost an average of 7.9% a year in the past five years through July, according toMorningstar Inc. … Still, some financial advisers say a small allocation to commodity exchange-traded products remains important for a long-term portfolio. Viewing the performance of a commodity ETF or ETN over a specific period of time in isolation would be a mistake, these advisers say, overlooking their diversification and inflation-hedging benefits. “Historically, commodities have demonstrated attractive returns with long-term performance and volatility similar to equities,” says Treven Ayers, chief investment officer at Clearview Wealth Management. In addition, commodity investments may offer low correlation to other asset classes, counter-cyclicality and improvements in risk-adjusted returns, says Mr. Ayers, whose Charlotte, N.C., firm manages $70 million. Commodities have been dragged down over the past 18 months, he says, but that won’t Read on! →

Cheryl Sherrard quoted in The Wall Street Journal

Planning to Retire in 2015? Read this. Before collecting that final paycheck, new retirees need to make important decisions. And it’s not just money. There’s also the issue of how people are going to fill their time in a rewarding way. “You don’t want to see people just stepping off a cliff into the big unknown,” says Cheryl Sherrard, director of financial planning at Clearview Wealth Management in Charlotte, N.C. “Planning and talking about the things that are ahead will make for a much smoother transition.” This is an excerpt from The Wall Street Journal article by Tom Lauricella. To read the article in its entirety, click here.

Treven Ayers, CIO quoted in the Wall Street Journal

Treven Ayers, CIO was quoted in the Wall Street Journal as part of an article entitled, “Oil’s Decline Creating Stock Bargains for Financial Advisers”. Treven Ayers, chief investment officer at Clearview Wealth Management in Charlotte, N.C., has also been taking advantage of the downturn, rebalancing client portfolios into the selloff. His firm, which manages $65 million, is finding opportunities in domestic and international stocks as well as energy-focused MLPs and global bonds. If you are a current subscriber to the Wall Street Journal online, you can view the entire article here.