The 2017 Tax Cuts & Jobs Act and you!

As we begin the new year, there are many changes afoot which will impact clients in a variety of ways.  The passage of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act introduces many changes to personal income taxation beginning with the 2018 tax return filing.  The following contains a few of the highlights which will impact your overall taxation going forward.     2017 Individual Income Tax Rates 2018 Individual Income Tax Rates Married Filing Jointly and Surviving Spouses: Married Filing Jointly and Surviving Spouses: 10% (Taxable income not over $18,650) 10% (Taxable income not over $19,050) 15% (Over $18,650 but not over $75,900) 12% (Over $19,050 but not over $77,400) 25% (Over $75,900 but not over $153,100) 22% (Over $77,400 but not over $165,000) 28% (Over $153,100 but not over $233,350) 24% (Over 165,000 but not over $315,000) 33% (Over $233,350 but not over $416,700) 32% (Over 315,000 but not over $400,000) 35% (Over $416,700 but not over 470,700) 35% (Over $400,000 but not over 600,000) 39.6% (over $470,700) 37% (over $600,000) Single Individuals: Single Individuals: 10% (Taxable income not Read on! →

Scams and Hackers and Safety, oh my!

At Clearview Wealth Management, we take the safety and security of your personal information very seriously.  It is essential in today’s global, wired world to protect yourself and your private information.  As we witness almost every day in the news, scams and hackers continue to threaten the security of our personal information.  Below are some areas to consider when enacting better protection over your personal information.     Password Tips Don’t use combinations of your personal information (names, date of birth, address, zip codes) as these are available to the public online. Use phrases like “I attended 1st grade at Edinboro Elementary in 1999”. For some sites you can use the entire phrase, but if not, you can abbreviate it to something like “Ia1gaEei#1999”. If available, use your fingerprint, key fob or voice recognition as your password. Security of your assets Investment Institutions Secured login to your financial institution website, including complex passwords, security questions and voice recognition security. Signature required for money movements and signature matching technology at custodian site Bi-directional oversight (you can verify our actions through your Read on! →

Moving from “tax” prep to “life” prep

At this time of year, everyone becomes a master at document gathering.  There is a shoe box or a filing system or a folder on your laptop to hold all the tax-related documents which are needed to complete your income tax returns.  It requires a diligent attitude to ensure nothing has been neglected or omitted which is important to the outcome of the bottom line.  Once the taxes have been submitted for the year, there is always a sigh of relief in getting to completion. Before you pack everything up and put it away for another year, take a step beyond tax prep and begin your life prep.  What does life prep really mean?  Like tax preparation, the devil is in the details and it is critical to your financial success that you take the time to examine and shore up the other areas of your financial life. You can start with that recently completed tax return.  Did you save to your employer plan and thereby reduce your current income?  If eligible, did you contribute to a Roth or regular Read on! →

2016 Tax and Plan Limits Announced

Based on recent Consumer Price Index (CPI) numbers, the IRS and Social Security Administration have announced their 2016 limits. Social Security Social Security benefits will not see a cost-of-living increase for 2016. For those individuals receiving Social Security benefits prior to Full Retirement Age (FRA) for Social Security, the earnings limit remains at $15,720. For every $2 in earnings above the limit, $1 in SS benefits will be withheld. For new Medicare recipients, the cost of Medicare Part B is likely to be significantly higher. Because of the lack of a Cost-of-Living increase in existing SS benefits, many of those already on Medicare will not see an increase in their Part B premiums due to a long-standing hold harmless rule.   Therefore, the increase in Medicare costs will have to be shouldered primarily by new Medicare recipients and high income recipients, unless Congress takes additional action to control these increases. For employees, Social Security and Medicare tax withholding are as follows: Social Security taxes will be withheld at a rate of 6.2% for employees up to a wage base of $118,500, Read on! →